We managed to snag an HTC Evo 4G before it went on sale to the general public. In true teardown fashion, we turned it on, played with the gorgeous screen for 5 minutes, and immediately relegated it to the carving table. Our friends at Wired were nice enough to record our disassembly for the world to see:

The Evo 4G was wonderfully easy to take apart, which should make servicing/repairing the phone very easy. Even so, HTC managed to avoid “ghastly” visible screws by using a removable back panel. Once the panel was removed, we were able to access the six T5 Torx screws and underlying components using a bit of care and precision.

HTC Evo 4G teardown

Teardown highlights:

  • Removing the glass is not terribly difficult. This is great news for those unfortunate enough to drop their shiny phone and crack the glass.
  • Like most reasonable phones, changing the Evo’s battery is a snap. All you have to do is remove the back cover and unplug the battery.
  • The 3.7 V, 1500 mAh rechargeable Li-ion battery contains 23% more capacity than an iPhone 3GS, 15% more than a Droid Incredible, and 7% more than a Nexus One.
  • Look out! There’s a liquid damage indicator on the battery’s top edge — a first that we’ve seen. Of course, you can just replace the battery if you douse the Evo in water. There are other liquid damage indicators on the phone, however, so you can’t fool the manufacturer that easily.
  • The Evo’s internal frame houses the stand, antennas, LED flashes, and speaker, and connects to the logic board via several ribbon cables.
  • The dual LED flash assembly consists of no more than two LEDs soldered to a small interconnect board.

Miro Djuric is an industrial engineer with extensive automotive and electronic tinkering experience.

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